Canadian 2014 $100 Grizzly Silver Coin for $100

Canadian 2014 $100 Grizzly Silver Coin for $100 Ordering is expected to open for everyone in a few days. While these $100 silver coins sell at face value and are GST/HST/PST tax exempt, the Royal Canadian Mint does charge for shipping and tax on shipping. Visit www.mint.ca for updates. The Mint is not expected to begin shipping the coins until December. 2014 $100 Grizzly Silver Coin, the second release from the Wildlife in Motion series of $100 silver coins that sell at face value. This silver series debuted in May with the 2013 $100 Bison Silver Coin (99.99% pure). It was limited to 50,000 and sold out now. Designs and Specifications for $100 Grizzly Silver Coin (2014) Designer: Claudio D’Angelo Reverse: the grizzly, head turned, a large trout held firmly in its mouth, appears patrolling in a shallow river stream along a Canadian landscape; surrounding the image are inscriptions reading 'CANADA', '2014' and the legal tender face value of '100 DOLLARS' Obverse: portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (Susanna Blunt’s); encircling inscriptions include 'ELIZABETH II' and 'D.G.

Category: Silver Coins


Spanish Colonial Eight Reales

Spanish Colonial Eight Reales The name "Spanish dollar" was used for a Spanish coin, the "real de a ocho" and later peso. It was worth eight reals (hence the nickname "pieces of eight"), and was widely circulated during the 18th century in the Spanish colonies in the New World, and in Spanish territories in Asia, namely in the Philippines. By the American Revolution in 1775, these Spanish coins became even more important. They backed paper money authorized by the individual colonies and the Continental Congress. The name "8-real" of the coin was especially the case in the English Speaking American colonies. This coin and its fractional parts, the half, one, two, and four Reales, were legal currency until February 21, 1857 in the U.S.,

Category: Silver Coins


Canadian Silver Dollar

Canadian Silver Dollar The first silver dollar was launched in 1935 to commemorate the jubilee of King George V. At the time, the reverse of the coin shows a voyager and an aboriginal along a birch-back canoe. The lines that are faint in the background represent the Northern Lights, and this design remained on the dollar right until 1986. Another dollar is the 1947 Voyageur Dollar, of which ten varieties still exist. These are placed into the categories of the Blunt Seven, the Maple Leaf and the Pointed Seven. There were two styles of the pointed seven canadian dollar in 1947. In one the 7 was a very tall figure with its lower tail pointing towards the right.

Category: Silver Coins


U.S. Trade Dollar

U.S. Trade Dollar The United States Trade Dollar is a silver dollar coin that was issued by the United States Mint. Production of these coins took place at Philadelphia, Carson City and San Francisco. The name Trade dollar came with the Feb. 12, 1873, act authorizing the coins. The designs were prepared by U.S Mint Engraver William Barber, following several rejected pattern designs. At first glance, the trade dollar looks much like a regular silver dollar. It's the same diameter. The obverse of the accepted design depicts the left seated figure of Liberty (facing China) wearing a beaded coronet and holding a ribbon with the motto LIBERTY in one hand and an olive branch in her extended right hand.

Category: Silver Coins


British crown coin

The name crown comes from the French gold couronne, issued by Philip of Valois about 1339, which featured as its obverse design, a large crown; and the ?cu ? la couronne issued by Charles VI of France about 1384, which had a shield surmounted by a crown. The first crown (that of the double rose) of Henry VIII had a reverse similar design to the "ecu d'or au soleil", a shield topped by a large crown, and for its obverse, had a double rose also topped by a large crown. "Crown" had become the common English name for the French ?cu, and for other Euro-pean coins of similar value. The Crown first appeared as a British coin denomination in 1544 under Henry VIII.

Category: Silver Coins


Ancient Greek coins. Athenian coinage

Ancient Greek coins are similar in appearance to modern ones. For a period of 1000 years and considering the small cities states and the colonies we can assume that there exists a rich set of different coins. The drachma was a currency that also the new Greek State adopted and that is now replaced by the EURO. This ends the history of the drachma which lasted for more than 1 millennium. Like other manufactured products in ancient Greece, Greek coins were made by hand. A blank metal circular "flan" was placed on an obverse die that rested on an anvil and then was struck with a hammer bearing a reverse die. The nature of the process naturally produced coins in which the image was often poorly centered on the flan.

Category: Silver Coins


The Maria Theresa Thaler

The Maria Theresa Thaler The Maria Theresa Thaler is probably one of the most famous and well known coins of the world circulated for over two centuries and are still minted today, largely for collectors. Many historians consider it to be the first example of a truly international currency, like the US dollar or the Euro. The origin of the term thaler goes back to the 16th century and the opening of silver deposits at St. Joachimsthal in Bohemia. Here the Counts of Schlick were given the right by the Habsburg court to mint coins in their own names, and their large silver coins became known as thalers (also often spelled taler ), short for Joachims-thaler, "the ones from the St.

Category: Silver Coins


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